Discovering the Isle of Seil on our open-top tour to Easdale

The road to the Isles of Seil and Easdale heads south west of Oban and takes in stunning views of Loch Feochan, a pictureque sealoch that stretches from Barrnacarry Bay.

Clachan Bridge, known as the Bridge over the Atlantic, is a simple, single-arched, hump-backed bridge that spans the Clachan Sound which links the west coast mainland with the island of Seil.  Around 13km southwest of Oban, it came to be called Bridge over the Atlantic because Clachan Sound connects at both ends of the Atlantic Ocean and can therefore be considered part of the ocean.  This famous bridge is photogenic all year round but in early summer a rare plant, the Fairy Foxglove, covers its stonework in a delicate shimmer of small purple flowers, making it even more beautiful.

Discovering the Isle of Seil on our open-top tour to Easdale

Once over the bridge, you are now on the Isle of Seil.  One of the 'slate' islands, Seil was famous for producing slate for roofing and the island's conservation village, Ellenabeich, features neat white terraces of worker's cottages crouching below cliffs on the westernmost tip of the island.  Ellenabeich has featured in a number of TV and films including Para Handy and Ring of Bright Water.  The village's main attractions are the gardens of An Cala with its glorious azaleas and Japanese flowering cherries in early summer and the Scottish Slate Island's Heritage Centre which is housed in one of the little white cottages.

Easdale Island is close-by and is only accessible by passenger ferry.  It is the smallest permanently-inhabited island of the Inner Hebrides and covers an area of less than 10 hectares but has a permanent population of about 60, plus a similar number who own homes on the island and visit regularly.